12.09.2014 - News

Prehistoric archaeological sites found at Stonehenge

Extraordinary range of archaeological sites found near Stonehenge with new methods of underground scans.


For four years, scientists have explored the territory, an area of 12 ​​square kilometers, penetrating to a depth of three meters. The researchers used a number of new instruments, including magnetometers, lasers, electromagnetic sensors, Georadars.

Among the findings, the age of which has 6000 years is 17 hitherto unknown wood and stone temples and places of worship, as well as dozens of hills. All attractions to the smallest detail, researchers have mapped. Most historic sites merges with the relief of the landscape, and are therefore invisible to the naked eye.

It was found 33-meter mound in the middle of which found the remains of a massive wooden structure. Perhaps it was a place to perform rituals associated with the dead.

The study found that Stonehenge is the center of a large complex of ritual monuments, not a separate building on the edge of Salisbury Plain.Extraordinary range of archaeological sites found near Stonehenge with new methods of underground scans.

For four years, scientists have explored the territory, an area of ​​square kilometers, penetrating to a depth of three meters. The researchers used a number of new instruments, including magnetometers, lasers, electromagnetic sensors, Georadars.

Among the findings, the age of which has 6000 years is 17 hitherto unknown wood and stone temples and places of worship, as well as dozens of hills. All attractions to the smallest detail, researchers have mapped. Most historic sites merges with the relief of the landscape, and are therefore invisible to the naked eye.

It was found 33-meter mound in the middle of which found the remains of a massive wooden structure. Perhaps it was a place to perform rituals associated with the dead.

The study found that Stonehenge is the center of a large complex of ritual monuments, not a separate building on the edge of Salisbury Plain.

Author: Anastasiia Trepyton
Source:  telegraph.co.uk